Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' A Portrait of the Social Economy in Northern Canada
'; ?>

A Portrait of the Social Economy in Northern Canada

A Portrait of the Social Economy in Northern Canada

Valoree Walker

Northern communities are currently facing many social and economic challenges. The non-profit, voluntary, and co-operative organizations involved in the social economy sector assist communities with these challenges by empowering them through the development of social and human capital. This article is part of an initial evaluation of the potential of the social economy to assist northern communities to deal with these challenges and develop this capacity. It offers an initial description of the state of the social economy in Canada's North through an examination of the results of a census of these organizations and a subsequent survey. The analysis shows that social economy organizations are particularly important to northern communities: they are more numerous and have more of an economic importance than in other regions of Canada. At the same time, these organizations are facing several important challenges that affect their ability to assist these communities such as a lack of funding, finding volunteers, retaining paid staff, and training.

Southcott, C. & Walker, V. Spring 2009. A Portrait of the Social Economy in Northern Canada. The Northern Review - Special Collection: The Social Economy of Northern Canada. Number 30. pages 13-36

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Soil Erosion Control - Interpretive Sign
'; ?>

Soil Erosion Control - Interpretive Sign

Soil Erosion Control - Interpretive Sign

Tanis Davey

interpretive sign

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Revegetation Experiment - Interpretive Sign
'; ?>

Revegetation Experiment - Interpretive Sign

Revegetation Experiment - Interpretive Sign

Tanis Davey

interpretive sign

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Survey of Yukon’s Knowledge Sector - Results and Recommendations'; ?>

Survey of Yukon’s Knowledge Sector - Results and Recommendations

Survey of Yukon’s Knowledge Sector - Results and Recommendations

Yukon's economy is dominated by mining, tourism and government.

Knowledge-based industries may be the answer to create meaningful growth in another sector that is neither cyclical like mining nor seasonal like tourism. This would increase diversification of the Yukon economy and grow small and medium size enterprises (SME). Growing the Yukon Knowledge Sector would increase Yukon’s tax base and thereby
reduce dependency on federal transfer payments.

This survey will also support Yukon’s initiatives towards Research, Innovation and Commercialization (RIC), as well as the Federal Government’s efforts to grow the Digital Economy (for example fostering the knowledge-based economy, identifying areas of collaboration).

In order to devise the future strategies of where we want to go, it is essential to determine where we are now. This Survey will be instrumental to achieve that.

Voswinkel, S. 2012. Survey of Yukon's Knowledge Sector: Results and Recommendations. Ylynx Management Consulting, Inc. and Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Background and FAQ on the Blest 240'; ?>

Background and FAQ on the Blest 240

default publication image

Stephen Mooney

This document attempts to answer the frequently asked questions we receive about the Blest 240.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Whitehorse District Heating Study'; ?>

Whitehorse District Heating Study

Whitehorse District Heating Study

Stephen Mooney

Yukon Energy, the City of Whitehorse, Cold Climate Innovation, Energy Solutions Centre, and the Yukon government hired a consulting firm to look into the idea of a community energy system for Whitehorse. The purpose of the study was to examine whether such a system is economically and technically feasible in the city.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' History of Human‐Bear Interactions at Congdon Creek Campground'; ?>

History of Human‐Bear Interactions at Congdon Creek Campground

History of Human‐Bear Interactions at Congdon Creek Campground

Scott Gilbert

The purpose of this report is to summarize the history of human‐bear interactions in the vicinity of the Congdon Creek campground between 1976 and 2013. The goal is to trace the development of the campground as well as an adjacent solid waste landfill and document, to the extent possible, the number and variety of human‐bear interactions that have occurred in the area over the last 37 years. This will serve as useful background information as we proceed with our experimental removal of soapberry bushes in the immediate campground area and will help determine if the number of human‐bear conflicts in the area is affected by removing natural attractants within the campground.


 

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Selective Removal of a Natural Bear Attractant (Soapberry) from the Kathleen Lake Campground'; ?>

Selective Removal of a Natural Bear Attractant (Soapberry) from the Kathleen Lake Campground

Selective Removal of a Natural Bear Attractant (Soapberry) from the Kathleen Lake Campground

One of the main visitor facilities in Kluane National Park (KNP) is the Kathleen Lake campground and day use area located about 30 k south of Haines Junction. Parks Canada staff manage a variety of visitor experiences at this site while trying to maintain conservation values. One of the ongoing public safety concerns has been human-bear interactions and a number of successful approaches have been employed to reduce conflicts between visitors and bears (Resource Conservation 2011). The Kathleen Lake area provides good habitat for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and Park managers consider the species an indicator of ecosystem health (Henry et al. 2008). Soapberry or buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) fruit, are an important diet item for bears during July and August and the Kathleen Lake campground has a moderately dense cover of this plant.

Soapberry is a medium sized (under 1 m tall) shrub that can appear early in succession after fire or disturbance and remain as an understory component of open forests. It occurs across North America and is found in a variety of habitat types in the Yukon. It is dioecious, that is, male and female flowers are produced on separate plants. The bright red berries form on the female plants and the soapberry crops in the Klunae area are known to vary between years (Krebs et al. 2009).

In 2010 a small group of students from the Renewable Resources Management Program at Yukon College worked with KNP staff on a bear habitat management project at the Kathleen Lake campground. At the suggestion of Lloyd Freese and Kevin McLaughlin, students and I initiated a pilot study to assess the efficacy of removing female soapberry bushes (S. canadensis) to reduce natural bear attractants in the overnight campground area. This report provides an update on the work that was carried out between 2010 and 2012 and outlines some suggestions for further work.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' RIC presentations - 2012'; ?>

RIC presentations - 2012

RIC presentations - 2012

Rick Steele

The Cold Climate Innovation (CCI) program of the Yukon Research Centre, hosted its first Research, Innovation & Commercialization (RIC) workshop on January 23rd and 24th 2012.  There was a great turn out for both days, 98 people attended the day sessions and 63 people attended the Innovation Think Tank.  Aside from the Think Tank sessions, this event also showcased a prototype of the Yukon Research Centre data server and featured presentations from agencies involved in research, innovation and commercialization.  

For this event the Yukon Research Centre demonstrated a prototype of their data server to local researchers and people who have a use or need for Yukon data.  The primary objective is to make this server the central Data Server for Yukon data, with interoperability with many other databases.

The presentations were presented by funding agencies that support research, innovation and commercialization.  The goal of these presentations was to help bridge the gap between Yukon inventors, researchers, individuals and businesses, with agencies that can support their work.  Also, in conjunction with the presentations, 4 Vignettes of innovative projects in the Yukon were presented at this event.

The Innovation Think Tank on Monday night was a lively evening of discussions around themed challenges.  The discussions' summaries are also available in the RIC 2012 Newsletter.  The aim was to bring inventors, thinkers, tinkerers, curious, an brilliant minds together to collectively work on solutions to northern challenges we face.

The Cold Climate Innovation and Technology Innovation programs would like to thank everyone who attended the workshop.  They hope you enjoyed the experience and were able to enhance your knowledge and networks.  They would also like to thank all the presenters for taking time out of their schedules to help make this a successful event.  

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' RIC presentations - 2014'; ?>

RIC presentations - 2014

RIC presentations - 2014

Rick Steele

Cold Climate Innovation (CCI) of the Yukon Research Centre hosted its 3rd annual Research, Innovation and Commercialization workshop on February 4th and 5th 2014. 

This year’s workshop was primarily IT based and featured a demonstration of a 3D printer.  Our keynote speaker for this year was Vasile Nedelciuc from the Eastern European Country of Moldova.  Mr. Nedelciuc is a politician for the Republic of Moldova and co-founder of the highly successful IT company, Endava.  

The majority of presenters at this year’s event were clients and associates of Cold Climate Innovation and Technology Innovation.  The primary goal was to educate the community on how the Cold Climate Innovation and Technology Innovation can help bring Yukoners’ innovative ideas into fruition, and also guide those ideas towards commercialization. 

In addition to the workshop, and in collaboration with the Yukon government’s  Department of Economic Development  and Yukonstruct, the CCI team launched a balloon into the stratosphere (~104,000 ft).  They got some amazing video footage, and great feedback from the community. The initial screening for this video was first seen by people who attended the evening session of the RIC event. 

The Cold Climate Innovation and Technology Innovation programs would like to thank everyone who attended the workshop. They hope you enjoyed the experience and were able to enhance your knowledge and networks.  They would also like to thank all the presenters for taking time out of their schedules to help make this a successful event.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Dawson Climate Change Adaptation Plan, Revised Edition'; ?>

Dawson Climate Change Adaptation Plan, Revised Edition

Dawson Climate Change Adaptation Plan, Revised Edition

The Dawson Adaptation Plan is based on a collaborative process that draws on the experience and knowledge of residents and integrates it with scientific expertise. The plan is primarily intended as a resource for community use and to support other planning and decision-making processes in the study area, which is defined by the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Traditional Territory. The Dawson Adaptation project team itself is made up of members of the International Polar Year Dawson Community Adaptation and Vulnerability in Arctic Regions (CAVIAR) team, and the Northern Climate ExChange (NCE).

Hennessey, R., Jones, S., Swales, S. and Duerden, F., 2011. Dawson Climate Change Adaptation Plan, Revised Edition. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 64 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Atlin Climate Change Adaptation Plan'; ?>

Atlin Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Atlin Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Atlin Adaptation Plan documents the community-led process of evaluating and addressing disaster mitigation and climate change in Atlin, British Columbia. The plan is the final report of the Atlin Adaptation Project, a three-year study of the projected impacts of climate change on
the community of Atlin. Earlier work in the project indicated the following: i) the community was vulnerable to climate change; and ii) the primary limiting factor inhibiting adaptation in the community was the capacity of residents to take action.

Hennessey, R., Love, N., Kinnear, L. and Duerden, F., 2011. Atlin Climate Change Adaptation Plan. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 55 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Future Histories of Whitehorse: Scenarios of Change'; ?>

Future Histories of Whitehorse: Scenarios of Change

Future Histories of Whitehorse: Scenarios of Change

Climate change is an increasing concern for Yukon and its communities. Many observable changes have occurred across the Territory over the past fifty years, especially an increase in the annual temperature and precipitation of the Western Arctic. The potential outcomes of changing climate have raised subsequent concerns for Yukon residents including a shifting distribution of country foods, the thaw of permafrost, changing landscape conditions, drought, and a host of other regional vulnerabilities. In response to this growing concern about climate change, the Northern Climate ExChange submitted a proposal to the Northern Strategy Trust in 2007 to develop and implement adaptation plans in three Yukon communities: Dawson, Whitehorse and Mayo. The Whitehorse Adaptation Project (WhiteCAP) began in June 2009 and brings together aspects of scenario planning and risk management to establish a process for adapting to climate change in the community.

Hennessey, R. and Streicker, J., 2010. Future Histories of Whitehorse: Scenarios of Change. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 39 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Whitehorse Climate Change Adaptation Plan'; ?>

Whitehorse Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Whitehorse Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Our goal has been to develop a community plan as a foundation in preparing Whitehorse for climate change. Our intention was that overall this work should contribute to the sustainable well-being of the community. The plan provides a broad analysis of the risks and opportunities of climate change, and makes a series of recommendations. It is now up to the decision-makers within the community - the City of  Whitehorse, Government of Yukon, Ta’an Kwäch’än Council, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and other community groups to decide upon the next steps and carry the work forward.
 

Hennessey, R. and Streicker, J., 2011. Whitehorse Climate Change Adaptation Plan. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 84 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Archaeological Excavations at the Little John Site, Southwest Yukon Territory, Canada - 2011'; ?>

Archaeological Excavations at the Little John Site, Southwest Yukon Territory, Canada - 2011

default publication image

The 2011 field excavations at the Little John site provided us with the opportunity to begin wide area excavations of the strata comprised of the Paleosol Complex and those below in a more rigorous fashion, allowing us to perceive more clearly additional preserved paleosols within the Loess below Paleosol horizon. Significantly, these lower levels also contain a relative abundance of decayed but still recognizable wood remains, some of which is definitively identified as belonging to Betula spp. and likely represents early colonization of the region by this species during the Birch Rise. The cultural affiliation of these organic remains is buttressed by their association with hearth features and culturally modified bones, although at the current extent of area exposure no clear patterning of their distribution is apparent to us. Work in 2012, which will continue to expose contiguous units to these levels, should assist us in this regard.

Easton, N. A. 2012 Archaeological Excavations at the Little John Site (KdVo6), Southwest Yukon Territory, Canada - 2011. Scottie Creek Culture History Project Research Manuscript 2012-02. Whitehorse: Yukon Research Centre.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Pelly Crossing Landscape Hazards (report/maps)'; ?>

Pelly Crossing Landscape Hazards (report/maps)

Pelly Crossing Landscape Hazards (report/maps)

Lacia Kinnear

The objective of this project was to identify landscape hazards in Pelly Crossing and nearby surroundings by compiling geoscience data from various field studies and scientific reviews (i.e., surficial geology and hydrology). This data was used to create a map of landscape hazards that delineate low, moderate and high-risk areas in the Pelly Crossing region. Potential impacts of a changing climate were incorporated in the identification of these three hazard zones.

This report is prepared as a guide, and not as a document upon which to base planning decisions. It is not intended for use as a basis for site selection for development, but rather as a guide in identifying areas that would require additional engineering studies, should  development be desired.

PDF versions of the hazards classification and surficial geology maps are avialable for download from the Yukon Research Centre website. Shapefiles of the hazards classification map are available for download from Geomatics Yukon.

Northern Climate Exchange, 2011. Pelly Crossing Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, 48 p. and 2 maps.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Mayo Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning (report/maps)'; ?>

Mayo Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning (report/maps)

Mayo Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning (report/maps)

Lacia Kinnear

The objective of this project was to identify landscape hazards in the Village of Mayo and nearby surroundings by compiling geoscience data from various field studies and scientific reviews (surficial geology, permafrost and hydrology). This data was used to create a map of landscape hazards that delineate low, moderate and high-risk areas in the Mayo region. Potential impacts of a changing climate were incorporated in the identification of these three hazard zones.

Concurrent to the Hazards Mapping Project, the Northern Climate ExChange has begun developing an adaptation plan for the community of Mayo. The hazards project has contributed significantly to the assessment of vulnerability for the community of Mayo. In particular, the Hazards Mapping Project has increased the understanding of how landscape characteristics may change in Mayo as regional climate conditions change. This information will be utilized in the adaptation plan to provide the basis for evaluating how community infrastructure, security and well-being may be influenced and how the community might take action to respond.

PDF versions of the hazards classification and surficial geology maps are avialable for download from the Yukon Research Centre website. Shapefiles of the hazards classification map are available for download from Geomatics Yukon.

Northern Climate Exchange, 2011. Mayo Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, 64 p. and 2 maps.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science'; ?>

Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science

Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science

The Compendium is intended to provide an overview of recent climate change work involving Yukon. It is comprised of various types of documents including scientific journal articles, government publications, workshop reports, and conference proceedings. The Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science 2003-2013 contains work completed in that time. A 2014 Supplement has been produced as an update to the Compendium and contains work completed since the original compendium.

Information for the Compendium was gathered through:
 ASTIS Database
 Polar Data Catalogue
 Yukon Biodiversity Database
 Hydrocarbon Impacts (HI) database
 Wolf Creek Research Basin database
 Kluane Lake Research Station Bibliography
 NCE Infosources Database and NCE Library
 Northern Research Institute Fellowship Grants list
 Forest Management in a Changing Climate: Compendium of Information Sources
 Government of Canada and Government of Yukon websites
 INAC Present and Past Climate Change Adaptation Projects list
 Internet searches
 Internal knowledge

The Compendium is not an exhaustive list of climate change-related work in Yukon over the period 2003-2013. A greater emphasis was placed on studies dated between 2007 and 2013 and information that is available online. We would appreciate being informed of any relevant information that should be included or if there are any errors in the Compendium. Supplements will be produced yearly and added to this webpage.

Northern Climate ExChange, 2013. Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science 2003-2013. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, 237 p.

Northern Climate ExChange, 2014. Compendium of Yukon Climate Change Science: 2014 Supplement. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, 26 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' The Forestry Chronicle - 2011'; ?>

The Forestry Chronicle - 2011

default publication image

Lisa Christensen

This article reports on an experimental civic engagement approach to link community observed cumulative effects ofnumerous local events and periods of resource development to indicators for sustainable forest and land management forthe future. We describe a process where the interview findings with 28 key aboriginal and non-aboriginal informants inthe Champagne Aishihik First Nations’ (CAFN) Traditional Territory were summarized into key themes by researchersin a community workshop to elicit a selection of social indicators for future cumulative effects assessments. Theseresponses were visions for the future based on a great deal of experiential learning that interviewees identified—part andparcel of any betterment to the community as new developments unfold. Themes such as “social healing” were furtherbroken into indicators such as “community support systems” and then further broken into local measures, such as “thepresence of, and access to, a youth centre, youth programs, and youth centres”. The local historical approach to cumulativeeffects assessment helps us not only understand more about forestry, but more about the broader connectionsbetween community members and leaders, forestry and other resource developments, and lessons people have learnedfrom the past and visions for the future.

L. Christensen, N. Krogman, and B. Parlee. 2011. A culturally appropriate approach to civic engagement: Addressing forestry and cumulative social impacts in southwest Yukon​

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Community Energy and Emissions Inventory: A Kluane First Nation-YRC Project (Poster)'; ?>

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory: A Kluane First Nation-YRC Project (Poster)

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory: A Kluane First Nation-YRC Project (Poster)

Lisa Christensen

The Kluane First Nation and the YRC have partnered to develop and pilot an energy use and greenhouse gas emissions inventory. This project analyzes the total energy used/emissions generated by local governments and communities in the Kluane Lake Region, considering the stationary energy, transport, land use, and waste sectors. Views on local energy success stories and energy concerns have been collected.

Christensen, L. 2012. Community Energy and Emissions Inventory: A Kluane First Nation-Yukon Research Centre Project. Poster presented at Arctic Frontiers 2012, Energies of the High North Conference, January 22-27, 2012, Tromsø, Norway.


Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Social thresholds and their translation into social-ecological management practices (poster)'; ?>

Social thresholds and their translation into social-ecological management practices (poster)

Social thresholds and their translation into social-ecological management practices (poster)

Lisa Christensen

Social thresholds and their translation into social-ecological management practices.

Abstract:

The objective of this paper is to provide a preliminary discussion of how to improve our conceptualization of social thresholds using (1) a more sociological analysis of social resilience, and (2) results from research carried out in collaboration with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations of the Yukon Territory, Canada. Our sociological analysis of the concept of resilience begins with a review of the literature followed by placement of the concept in the domain of sociological theory to gain insight into its strengths and limitations. A new notion of social thresholds is proposed and case study research discussed to support the proposition. Our findings suggest that rather than view social thresholds as breakpoints between two regimes, as thresholds are typically conceived in the resilience literature, that they be viewed in terms of collectively recognized points that signify new experiences. Some examples of thresholds identified in our case study include power in decision making, level of healing from historical events, and a preference for small-scale development over large capital intensive projects.

Christensen, L. and N. Krogman. 2012. Social thresholds and their translation into social-ecological management practices. Ecology and Society 17 (1): 5.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Herschel Island Qikiqtaryuk - a natural and cultural history of Yukon’s Arctic island - 2013'; ?>

Herschel Island Qikiqtaryuk - a natural and cultural history of Yukon’s Arctic island - 2013

Herschel Island Qikiqtaryuk - a natural and cultural history of Yukon’s Arctic island - 2013

Dave Mossop

Hawks and owls are at the top of the food chain on Herschel Island, and these raptors, or birds of prey, are powerful indicators of the health and productivity of natural communites. Four species nest annually at Qikiqtaryuk, while another eight have been seen there from time to time. Herschel Island's raptors provide some of the best, most reliable wildlife viewing for visitors because the open tundra puts their lives on such clear display. Their nests are on the ground at the edges and on the ledges of creek-side and ocean bluffs and on other prominent landmarks. Some of the nests are perched precariously on eroding ocean cliffs. Their courting displays, hunting startegies, peredator-defence behaviour, and regal presence are almost impossible to miss. The breeding status and success of these birds is recorded annually by park rangers and visiting biologists as part of the island's ecological monitoring program.

MOSSOP, D.H. 2012. Birds of Prey. Herschel Island Qikiqtaryuk: a natural and cultural history of Yukon's Arctic Island. In C.R. Burn (Ed.). pages 103 - 106. University of Calgary Press.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' The Kloo Wetland, A Reconnaissance of its Ecological Diversity 1988-93'; ?>

The Kloo Wetland, A Reconnaissance of its Ecological Diversity 1988-93

The Kloo Wetland, A Reconnaissance of its Ecological  Diversity 1988-93

Dave Mossop

The Kloo Wetland is an area of approximately 100 sq. km. of just over 340 small to medium sized ponds and lakes associated with the floodplain of the Jarvis River in the South Western Yukon. It includes two larger lakes, Kloo and Sulphur, and is about 30 km NW of the village of Haines  Junction, YT. In 1980, an area of 447 sq. km. including the wetland was identified as ‘critical’ wildlife habitat by map notation for Land Use decision purposes
(Yukon Waterfowl Management Plan, 1985, 1990). This designation was based simply on the obvious concentration of waterbodies and the area’s known value to wildlife species and to local people.

Wetlands are recognised in the Yukon as supporting a major portion of the territory’s biodiversity. Documenting wetland values at Kloo was a first step in developing conservation and management plans for the area. Two major sources for this data base are technical wetland analysis as reported here, and local traditional knowledge of the elders of the Champagne/Aishihik First Nation. This report is mostly the portion contributed by the former from a five-year period of field research (1988-93) although C.A. First Nation elder Frank Joe (deceased) gave valuable assistance with
the field logistics and offered good sound advice about the area generally.

The water birds of the area provided a powerful ‘focus’ of study. They are totally dependant on the functioning of the wetland ecosystem;  understanding their relative abundance, productivity and general use of the area gives a good ecosystem-level understanding of the critical features which will have to be protected if the wetland is to continue to function in the future.

2007. The Kloo wetland, a reconnaissance of its ecological diversity 1988-93. Northern Res. Inst. Ms 40 pp.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' A Survey of Bird Use of the Wetlands of the Tachun-to-Minto Yukon Valley'; ?>

A Survey of Bird Use of the Wetlands of the Tachun-to-Minto Yukon Valley

A Survey of Bird Use of the Wetlands of the Tachun-to-Minto Yukon Valley

Dave Mossop

The 48-km stretch of the Yukon Valley from the mouth of Tatchun Creek to Minto Crossing was surveyed. 110 islands, just over 50 back channels, plus 14 off-channel ponds constitute the wetland habitat most used by birds. Two key areas were groupings of islands and mid-channel bars, one near Yukon Crossing and one near the mouth of McCabe creek. We found 31 species of water birds using the area. Vegetation on river bars and islands was key. In constant successional stage, riparian willow bordered by a grass and sedge community with horsetail as the key emergent was used principally by migrating waterfowl. Breeding by waterfowl was a minor use, (5 species). A relatively dense assemblage of birds of prey indicate a highly productive area: 6 pairs of Bald eagles and 3 pairs of peregrine falcons were recorded. The inordinate mix of islands and cut off channels in the region with its obvious use by spawning salmon are key to the reason the area has such high local value. Moose, wolves, bears and a variety of small mammals along with 95 species of birds were found using the habitats of this river reach. Protecting the ecology of the area will involve maintaining the current hydrologic regime, protecting critical habitats from disturbance and avoiding contaminating the key back channels and inflow streams.

2009. A survey of bird use of the wetlands of the Tatchun-to-Minto Yukon valley. Northern Research Inst Ms. Yukon College: Partner: Little  Salmon/Carmacks First Nation - 22pp.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' The Yukon Biodiversity Working Group -  Annual Forums’ Programs and Abstracts'; ?>

The Yukon Biodiversity Working Group -  Annual Forums’ Programs and Abstracts

The Yukon Biodiversity Working Group -  Annual Forums’ Programs and Abstracts

Dave Mossop

The Biodiversity Working Group is a non-government open-membership group of those involved in ongoing biodiversity assessment and monitoring projects throughout the Yukon. It is hosted through the Yukon Research Center at Yukon College and meets informally during winter months.

The vision is in four basic parts:

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' The overwhelming influence of ptarmigan abundance on Gyrfalcon reproductive success in the Yukon'; ?>

The overwhelming influence of ptarmigan abundance on Gyrfalcon reproductive success in the Yukon

The overwhelming influence of ptarmigan abundance on Gyrfalcon reproductive success in the Yukon

Dave Mossop

"The overwhelming influence of ptarmigan abundance on Gyrfalcon reproductive success in the central Yukon, Canada."

Abstract:

Companion studies of Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) and Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) in the central Yukon from 1978 to 1983 allowed us to examine Gyrfalcon reproductive performance at 14 nest sites in relation to ptarmigan abundance and other potential effects, including
weather variables, the previous year’s success, nest site characteristics, and Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting density. Ptarmigan abundance declined six-fold and was mirrored by a significant decline in Gyrfalcon breeding success (breeding failure 58%, clutch desertion 33%). Clutch size showed little variation, although deserted nests held fewer eggs than did successful nests, and there were more four-egg clutches when ptarmigan were most abundant. An average of 2.26 young fledged per nest during abundant ptarmigan years, and 0.l8 when ptarmigan were declining. No other factors were correlated with Gyrfalcon reproductive success. Juvenile ptarmigan density had a compensatory effect: even when ptarmigan breeding numbers dipped, Gyrfalcons bred successfully if the proportion of juvenile ptarmigan was high. Clutch initiation date was a good predictor of Gyrfalcon breeding performance. Early clutches had more eggs (67% with 4 eggs compared to 27% in late nests), were less likely to be deserted (5% vs. 59%), and fledged more young (93% vs. 38%). Two Gyrfalcon pairs, supplemented with food in a poor ptarmigan year, fledged young at a rate and schedule comparable to pairs during a peak ptarmigan year. We discuss interesting observations about Gyrfalcon brood success, as well as Golden Eagle nesting density as a potentially important aspect of the reproductive ecology of Gyrfalcons in this population. Received 12 January 2011, accepted 9 May 2011.

BARICHELLO, N., AND MOSSOP, D.H. 2011. The overwhelming influence of ptarmigan abundance on Gyrfalcon reproductive success in the central Yukon, Canada. In R. T. Watson, T. J. Cade, M. Fuller, G. Hunt, and E. Potapov (Eds.). Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a Changing World. The Peregrine Fund, Boise, Idaho, USA. http://dx.doi.org/10.4080/gpcw.2011.0205

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Long-term studies of Willow Ptarmigan and Gyrfalcon in the Yukon Territory'; ?>

Long-term studies of Willow Ptarmigan and Gyrfalcon in the Yukon Territory

Long-term studies of Willow Ptarmigan and Gyrfalcon in the Yukon Territory

Dave Mossop

"Long-term studies of Willow Ptarmigan and Gyrfalcon in the Yukon Territory: A collapsing 10-year cycle and its apparent effect on the top predator."

Abstract:

From the late 1950s to the present, several study plots across the Yukon have been variously surveyed annually for territorial Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus). Beginning in the mid-1970s, Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) breeding numbers in the same tundra systems have been monitored annually. These data are held in a long-term data base. Monitoring has supported studies of winter survival strategies, tests of population change theory, and reproductive strategy. Willow Ptarmigan are seen as a ‘keystone’ in the tundra community. Understanding and tracking very basic trophic interrelationships with the Gyrfalcon, the top predator, has been a major effort at community study. Stable, regular, synchronous, 10-year cycles have been demonstrated in both species. However, beginning in 2000, monitoring surveys have been suggesting the regular cycling of ptarmigan abundance may be faltering—the population peaks seem to be disappearing, although there is no evidence of imminent local extinctions. The potential consequence to the tundra ecosystem is suggested in disruption at the top of the food chain—Gyrfalcons are breeding much later, may be producing fewer young, and seem to be declining in abundance. Simple modeling suggests Gyrfalcon productivity through the few years of peak ptarmigan productivity may be critical. It will be important to maintain longer monitoring to demonstrate conclusively this change as well as causes. Received 31 December 2010, accepted 20 June 2011.

MOSSOP, D. H. 2011. Long-term studies of Willow Ptarmigan and Gyrfalcon in the Yukon Territory: A collapsing 10-year cycle and its apparent effect on the top predator. In R. T. Watson, T. J. Cade, M. Fuller, G. Hunt, and E. Potapov (Eds.). Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a Changing World. The Peregrine Fund, Boise, Idaho, USA. http://dx.doi.org/10.4080/gpcw.2011.0206

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Why are American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations declining in North America?'; ?>

Why are American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations declining in North America?

Why are American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations declining in North America?

Dave Mossop

Why are American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations declining in North America? Evidence from nest-box programs.

Abstracts:

ABSTRACT.---Declines in American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations are widely reported, and Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data suggest that the North American population declined significantly from 1984 to 2007. Potential factors include the spread of West Nile Virus (WNV), increases in populations of Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii), and loss of suitable habitat. We examined trends in the numbers of both migratory and resident kestrel populations that use nest boxes in eight study areas in Florida, Georgia, Virginia and Maryland, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon Territory, 1984-2007. Except for the most recent nest box program, established in 1995 and declining since 2002, all nest box populations began to experience declines before WNV arrived in North America in 1999. To test whether changes in kestrel population densities generally are associated with the opposite trend in Cooper's Hawks, we examined the 42
BBS physiographic regions for which trends for both species were available. No significant correlations were detected for the period  1966—2007, or for 1980--2007, more closely concurrent with our nest box data. Christmas Bird Count data from 1959 through 1988 also failed to demonstrate a significant correlation. Finally, the habitat within our study areas still appears suitable, and the remaining kestrels appear healthy and have high reproductive success. Thus, the principle cause of the decline probably lies elsewhere, perhaps on the wintering grounds or along migration routes. Further, for both migratory and resident populations, the decline in nest box occupancy may reflect regional declines, which would reduce the availability of individuals available for replacing nest box-breeding birds that have died or dispersed.

MOSSOP. D.H., 2009. Why are American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations declining in North America? Evidence from nest-box programs. J. Raptor Res 43(4) 274-282. (J.A Smallwood sr. author)

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' The Shallow Bay wetland. An analysis of its natural history and a plan for protection.'; ?>

The Shallow Bay wetland. An analysis of its natural history and a plan for protection.

default publication image

Shallow Bay is a 230 hectare wetland at the south end of Lake Laberge in the southern Yukon. It has been central to the original use of the area by the Ta’an Kwachan first nation. It is an important waterfowl staging area; a key fish spawning and rearing area, and is used by moose, beaver, bear, mustelids, muskrats and a host of bird species. We found 36 species of water birds using the area; banded waterfowl showed birds from all North American flyways except the Atlantic were using the area. Most use by water birds was for staging although at least 4 species were breeding. Over 100 species of songbirds were observed and at least 17 species were breeding. Wood frogs, and 9 species of fish were identified. 6 species of birds of prey were found hunting in the wetland; only N.goshawk was found breeding. The vegetation community consists of three major zones: aquatic, emergent and riparian periodically flooded shrub. Water of the bay is mostly from the one small inflow creek, Horse Creek, although annually silts from the major Yukon drainage contribute to the benthics of the wetland. Critical to the area’s ecology is the hydrologic regime of annual flooding of the emergent and riparian shrub zones. The flooded riparian zones are heavily used by brood rearing water birds and by many thousands of young fish. Benthic and aquatic invertebrates represent much of the area’s biomass. Protection measures and planning for the areas future must include controlling recreational use (including hunting, and motorized access), managing its unique water level regime, protecting its water inflow, and supporting is obvious considerable educational values. A legally protected habitat area will probably be required to ensure the critical process of the area continue in perpetuity.

2007. The Shallow Bay wetland. An analysis of its natural history and a plan for protection. K.Robichaud and D. Mossop. N.R.I ms, Yukon College 45 pp
 

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Passive Treatment of Mine Drainage Waters: The Use of Biochar and Wood Products (conf. proceedings)'; ?>

Passive Treatment of Mine Drainage Waters: The Use of Biochar and Wood Products (conf. proceedings)

default publication image

Passive biological treatments have been proposed as a possible efficient and cost effective treatment method for metal bearing water discharged from mine sites after closure. Several biofilters are under study in Yukon and have produced variable, but promising results up to now. However, concerns are typically expressed around biological treatments and their suitability in northern, colder climates. Biofilters allow for metal removal using a variety of chemical, physical and biological mechanisms. If biological processes are affected by a cold climate to some extent, chemical processes are typically not affected by the temperature the same way and can be reliable in cold waters. This study focused on metal sorption and metal removal by chemical mechanisms and assessed the sorption capacity of biochar and wood products which could be later introduced in bioreactors to help with metal removal from mine-impacted cold waters.

Biochars allowed for more than 90% removal of Cd, Cu and Zn from a metal-bearing effluent along with 35 to 69% removal of arsenic. Wood products displayed good removal capacity as well, in the range of 51 to 94% for Cd, Cu and Zn. However, arsenic and selenium removal by wood products was limited; Se also showed minimal sorption on biochars and was in one case released during sorption testing. Metal leaching from the materials was observed to some extent, including Cu and Zn from poplar and spruce products. Amongst spruce products, the chips from the trunk proved to be slightly more efficient than the needles. Overall, biochars and wood products showed potential for use in water treatment for metal sequestration in combination with other mechanisms such as sulfide precipitation in sulfate-reducing bioreactors. Such materials could be collected or produced on remote mine sites and could help with mine remediation.

Janin, A. and J. Harrington. 2013. Passive treatment of mine drainage waters: the use of biochars and wood products to enhance metal removal efficiency. Proceedings of the 2013 Northern Latitudes Mining Reclamation Workshop and 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Land Reclamation Association.  Overcoming Northern Challenges.  Whitehorse, Yukon September 9 – 12, 2013, p. 90-99.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Industry Academia Joint Research - SCOPe March 2014 (presentation)'; ?>

Industry Academia Joint Research - SCOPe March 2014 (presentation)

default publication image

Amelie Janin

Since January 2013, Yukon College has partnered with Access Consulting Group, Alexco Resources Group, Capstone Mining, Victoria Gold Corp and Yukon Zinc Corp. As a result of this partnership, the NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Mine Life Cycle was attributed to Yukon College and the industrial partners with the objective to advance environmental remediation techniques applicable in Yukon. The benefits of this collaborative approach between the academic researcher and the industrial partners our outlined in a presentation by Dr. Amelie Janin (NSERC Industrial Research Chair) and David Petkovich (General Manager at Access Consulting),an advisor for this research program. Tips and tricks on developing industry-focused research and research partnerships are covered in this presentation.

This presentation was delivered in early 2014 for the Science Community of Practice (SCOPe), a new initiative of the Interdepartmental Science Committee of Yukon Government. SCOPe activities may include brown bag lunch talks, field tours, informal discussion groups, workshops and networking opportunities, such as Science After Hours.

 

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Mine Life Cycle - Geoscience Forum 2013 (presentation)'; ?>

NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Mine Life Cycle - Geoscience Forum 2013 (presentation)

default publication image

Amelie Janin

This presentation outlines the current projects and services that the Yukon Research Centre can provide to industry working in the North.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Green Mining Matters - Winter 2014 (newsletter)'; ?>

Green Mining Matters - Winter 2014 (newsletter)

Green Mining Matters - Winter 2014 (newsletter)

Amelie Janin

Green Mining Matters is a quartely newsletter from the desk of the NSERC Industrial Research Chair for Colleges in Mine Life Cycle, Dr. Amelie Janin.

Dr. Janin and her partners, Alexco Resources Corp., Capstone Mining Corp., Yukon Zinc Corp. and Victoria Gold Corp., are currently developing research leadership in order to address northern-specific challenges and opportunities within the mining industry. Together, the academic researchers and the industrial partners will develop technologies for a smarter, greener way of mining. The role of the academic researchers is to develop new ideas and test modern technologies. The results of their research, in conjunction with the support and investigations by the industrial partners, provide invaluable scientific knowledge to Yukon’s mining sector.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Cambridge Bay Energy and Emissions Inventory'; ?>

Cambridge Bay Energy and Emissions Inventory

default publication image

A Partnership Project by the Yukon Research Centre, the Hamlet of Cambridge Bay, and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.

Yukon Research Centre, Hamlet of Cambridge Bay, and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, 2014. Community Energy and Emissions Inventory, a Partnership Project by the Yukon Research Centre, the Hamlet of Cambridge Bay, and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Cambridge Bay Energy Survey Report Highlights Document'; ?>

Cambridge Bay Energy Survey Report Highlights Document

Cambridge Bay Energy Survey Report Highlights Document

Cambridge Bay Energy Survey Report Highlights Document

Summary paper highlighting the findings from the Cambridge Bay Enegery Survey Final Report

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Community Energy and Emissions Inventory Cambridge Bay Final Report'; ?>

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory Cambridge Bay Final Report

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory Cambridge Bay Final Report

Cambridge Bay Community Energy and Emissions Inventory Final Report

Concurrent with climate change impacts are community responses to them. Management of energy resources, with a focus on conservation and the development of renewable energy, is one way in which northern peoples are responding to climate change—the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions being the central point. Beyond climate change, dependency on oil for electricity and heat generation creates added incentive for communities to seek more sustainable modes of energy production. It is in this context that Cambridge Bay and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station are exploring energy use and greenhouse gas emissions inventorying as a tool to support energy-related planning and decision making.

Following the International Local Government Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Protocol, total energy used/emissions generated in 2012 by local governments and the participating community were analyzed. Consideration was given to stationary energy (electricity and heat generation), transport, land use, and waste sectors. In Spring 2013, structured interviews were carried out with residents and commercial and government operators to determine the types of energy people depend on, how much they use, and how much it costs them; views on local energy success stories and energy concerns were also solicited. Summarized information will be presented to the community in Spring 2014 for sharing and verification purposes and final products will be produced thereafter.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Indigenous Self-Determination'; ?>

Indigenous Self-Determination

Indigenous Self-Determination

Indigenous Self-Determination booklet

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Burwash Wind Study Report'; ?>

Burwash Wind Study Report

Burwash Wind Study Report

Report on the study into the feasibility of utilizing wind for alternatve energy in Destruction Bay/Burwash

Over one year of wind measurements have now been collected at the Kluane Wind Project site and the data has been analysed and correlated to Burwash Landing’s airport to provide an estimate of long term mean wind speed at the site. While the wind speed at 50 m above ground level (AGL) was 6.2 m/s for the October 2012 to November 2013 period the projected long term mean wind speed is estimated to be 6.8 m/s (projected to 2001‐2013 period). The Burwash airport wind measurements show that the average wind speed during the 2012‐13 period was at 93% of long term average. These recent measurements projected to long term are consistent with previous measurement campaigns and reports. The business plan used a long term mean wind speed of 6.9 m/s at 50 m AGL for calculating wind energy production.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Wireline Modem Development for Real Time Borehole Monitoring Final Report'; ?>

Wireline Modem Development for Real Time Borehole Monitoring Final Report

Wireline Modem Development for Real Time Borehole Monitoring Final Report

Final report detailing the success of the project to develop a functional surface communication system including both a downhole and surface modem that communicates with all of the Icefield Corporations’ existing products, transmits and receives data and works with common wireline cables, trucks and monitoring devices that are standard. Working to challenging timeline ICefield Tools exceeded the expections of the project. Icefield Tools and CCI feels confident with the design and implementation of this device, Icefield will begin marketing the completed product late in the 3rd quarter of 2014. This will include trade events for both mining and oil & gas, demonstrations with existing clients.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (poster)'; ?>

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (poster)

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (poster)

This poster was presented at the International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences (ICASS) VIII on May 22-26th 2014 at UNBC in Prince George, BC.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Haines Junction Bioenergy Project – Evaluation of Waste Heat Potential'; ?>

Haines Junction Bioenergy Project – Evaluation of Waste Heat Potential

Haines Junction Bioenergy Project – Evaluation of Waste Heat Potential

The Dakwakada Development Corporation (DDC), the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations (CAFN), Yukon Energy Corporation, Cold Climate Innovation of the Yukon
Research Centre, and the Village of Haines Junction are investigating the potential for a biomass power plant in the Haines Junction community. The plant is expected to provide renewable electricity for the territory and has the potential to produce a viable community heat source and create local economic opportunities. To this end, the proponents are interested in investigating the use of the power plant’s thermal energy production to create benefit for the community.

The following report endeavours to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing the waste heat from a 500 kWe bioenergy gasification plant in the Haines
Junction area and, when possible, the secondary option of using heat from a 2 MWe power plant was also considered. The options evaluated in this report include a
community District Energy System (DES), increased electrical power production with Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) technology, and localized food production through
Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) Greenhouses.

The report evaluates these options against a set of criteria including, technical feasibility, economic feasibility, environmental impacts, socioeconomic considerations, and risk. A previous phase of the work also considered preliminary siting considerations. Based on secondary research, Excel-based modeling, and interviews with numerous experts and suppliers, a set of preliminary recommendations are made to the project proponents. It is understood that ultimately the community must evaluate the options available to them through the lens of their own priorities and criteria, as well as better define the nature and scale of the proposed biomass power plant. However, given what is currently known about the project, the lowest risk, highest community benefit would appear to stem from the implementation of a very simple heat network that distributes heat from the 500 kWe power plant to the community school in Haines Junction. In the less likely event that a 2 MWe system is selected, the option of a DES serving the school, arena complex, convention centre and swimming pool complex is considered the most viable.

Both the options of CEA greenhouses and ORC were deemed to have risks in excess of benefits and were not ultimately advocated for. Nevertheless, further work to confirm project feasibility will be required once the power plant has been selected, siting confirmed, and the quality and quantity of heat available corroborated.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Versatile machine and happy bacteria serve science, education and mining at Yukon College (article)'; ?>

Versatile machine and happy bacteria serve science, education and mining at Yukon College (article)

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and the YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Yukon Bioenergy Demonstration Project'; ?>

Yukon Bioenergy Demonstration Project

Yukon Bioenergy Demonstration Project

Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Stantec) was contracted by a Steering Committee led by Yukon Energy Corporation (YEC) and the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations (CAFN) to complete a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) Study for the Yukon Bioenergy Demonstration Project in Haines Junction, Yukon. The focus of the study was to evaluate available biomass gasification technologies for application in the North in the range of 2 MWe – 4 MWe and determine its potential viability. The primary objectives were to complete a preliminary design of the facility, define its business case, draft baseline conditions and an impact assessment to form part of a submission to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board (YESAB), and develop and support the engagement of CAFN members and members of the public.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining'; ?>

Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining

Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining

2014 brochure for CNIM

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Landscape hazards - Centre d’Etudes Nordiques colloque (poster)'; ?>

Landscape hazards - Centre d’Etudes Nordiques colloque (poster)

Landscape hazards - Centre d’Etudes Nordiques colloque (poster)

This poster was developed for display at the Centre d'Études Nordiques annual seminar, held in Quebec City in February 2014.  It uses the Northern Climate ExChange's hazards mapping comic to illustrate our landscape hazards mapping initiative, which creates maps of climate-related landscape hazards for Yukon communities. The maps help communities understand how land responds to environmental change, and plan for future development. The poster shows the hazards map produced for the Burwash Landing area.

Benkert, B., Kennedy, K., Fortier, D., Lewkowicz, A., Doré, G., Grandmont, K. (2014) Cartographie des risques et capacité d'adaptation des communautés du Yukon, Canada. Colloque annuel du Centre d’études nordiques, 12-13 février, Centre Eau Terre Environnement de l'INRS, Québec, QC, Canada.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Report to the Community'; ?>

Report to the Community

Report to the Community

Report to the Community 2014

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' 2014-15 Academic Calendar'; ?>

2014-15 Academic Calendar

2014-15 Academic Calendar

2014-15 Academic Calendar

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - 2014'; ?>

Your Yukon - 2014

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and the YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' SCET Winter 2014 Course Guide'; ?>

SCET Winter 2014 Course Guide

SCET Winter 2014 Course Guide

School of Continuing Education Course Guide for Winter 2014.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay Landscape Hazards (report/maps)'; ?>

Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay Landscape Hazards (report/maps)

Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay Landscape Hazards (report/maps)

This project investigates contemporary landscape hazards related to permafrost degradation, surficial geology and hydrology in Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay, Yukon. It also considers potential future landscape evolution in response to changes in climate. The work is accomplished by gathering and mapping geoscience data, including landscape metrics, surficial geology, permafrost conditions and hydrology. Projections of future climate variability (e.g., temperature, precipitation, freeze and thaw dates) for each community are used to identify potential future trajectories of change.

Risk associated with landscape hazards mapped as part of this project are ranked in four categories, reflecting progressively increasing levels risk. Risk categories are represented graphically on maps for the Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay area in traffic light colours for ease of interpretation and communication. By incorporating projections of future climate variability, landscape hazards classification will reflect both contemporary and potential future conditions.

Because the maps help define potential landscape responses to environmental change, they can be used as a climate change adaptation planning tool that informs policy development and planning decisions. The maps and reports are relevant for communities and First Nations, as well as engineers, planners, consultants, and all levels of governmental and non-govenermental decision-makers. 

PDF versions of the hazards classification and surficial geology maps are avialable for download from the Yukon Research Centre website. Shapefiles of the hazards classification map are available for download from Geomatics Yukon.

Northern Climate ExChange, 2013.  Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay Landscape Hazards: Geological Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, 111 p. and 2 maps.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Hazards - Kluane Region Edition (comic)'; ?>

Hazards - Kluane Region Edition (comic)

Hazards - Kluane Region Edition (comic)

A glimpse at what our hazards researchers do.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Cambridge Bay Energy and Emissions Inventory (card)'; ?>

Cambridge Bay Energy and Emissions Inventory (card)

Cambridge Bay Energy and Emissions Inventory (card)

This card was delivered to the residents of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Mapping Bumps on the Road: Thawing Permafrost and the North Alaska Highway'; ?>

Mapping Bumps on the Road: Thawing Permafrost and the North Alaska Highway

Mapping Bumps on the Road: Thawing Permafrost and the North Alaska Highway

Thawing Permafrost and the North Alaska Highway

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Hazards: Mapping Climate Change Risks in Your Community (card)'; ?>

Hazards: Mapping Climate Change Risks in Your Community (card)

Hazards: Mapping Climate Change Risks in Your Community (card)

Yukon communities are more affected by climate change than any other region of Canada - and Yukoners are preparing for those changes.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Mine Restoration with Biochar (card)'; ?>

Mine Restoration with Biochar (card)

Mine Restoration with Biochar (card)

Increasing revegetation success with biochar.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - Archive 2013'; ?>

Your Yukon - Archive 2013

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and the YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Northern Greenhouse Research Project (brochure)'; ?>

Northern Greenhouse Research Project (brochure)

Northern Greenhouse Research Project (brochure)

Cold Climate Innovation (CCI) is exploring new technologies that can bring northern greenhouses into the 21st century.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - Archive 2009'; ?>

Your Yukon - Archive 2009

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - Archive 2010'; ?>

Your Yukon - Archive 2010

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - Archive 2011'; ?>

Your Yukon - Archive 2011

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Landscape Hazards in Yukon Communities (poster)'; ?>

Landscape Hazards in Yukon Communities (poster)

Landscape Hazards in Yukon Communities (poster)

This poster was developed for display at the 2012 Yukon Gesocience Forum.  It describes the Northern Climate ExChange's landscape hazards mapping initiative, which creates maps of climate-related landscape hazards for Yukon communities. The maps help communities understand how land responds to environmental change, and plan for future development. The poster higlights research focused on the Burwash Landing area.

Benkert, BE, Kennedy, K, NCE Researchers and Kluane First Nation. 2012. Landscape Hazards in Yukon Communities: Geoscience Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation Planning. Yukon Geoscience Forum, Whitehorse, Yukon. Poster presentation.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Geoscience Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation'; ?>

Geoscience Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation

Geoscience Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation

Geoscience mapping conducted for this project was used to identify current and future landscape hazards in the Mayo and Pelly areas. The combined properties of surficial material type, landform shape and slope, hydrological regime, climate regime, and permafrost conditions were used to assign hazard rankings to the landscape around the communities of Pelly Crossing and Mayo. Final reports are available for download for both Mayo and Pelly Crossing.

Kennedy, K., Benkert, B., Bond, J. and Kinnear, L. (2011) Gesocience Mapping for Climate Change Adaptation. Poster presentation delivered to Mayo and Pelly Crossing, YT, March 2011.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Community Geological Hazard Mapping Project (poster)'; ?>

Community Geological Hazard Mapping Project (poster)

Community Geological Hazard Mapping Project (poster)

Initiated in 2010, the Community Geological Hazard Mapping Project aims to provide science-based hazard maps at a scale of 1:20 000 for development and planning in Yukon communities. New surficial geological mapping will be integrated with existing subsurface data, hydrologic regimes, and local permafrost characteristics to assess potential landscape hazards (e.g., floods, landslides, subsidence) and predict how projected changes in climate may affect these hazards in the future. This poster describes landscape hazard mapping initiatives in the Mayo and Pelly Crossing regions. Since publication of this poster, the project has since been completed and project maps and reports are available for download.

Kennedy, K., Kinnear, L., Calmels, F., Bonnaventure, P., Benkert, B., and Bond, J. (2011) Commuity Geological Hazard Mapping Project. Yukon Geoscience Forum, Whitehorse, Yukon. Poster presentation.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Partners for Children'; ?>

Partners for Children

Partners for Children

Partners for Children newsletter

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Tracks'; ?>

Tracks

Tracks

Breaking trails in Yukon Community Health

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Yukon Community Adaptation Program: A Review of 5 Years of Planning for Climate Change'; ?>

Yukon Community Adaptation Program: A Review of 5 Years of Planning for Climate Change

Yukon Community Adaptation Program: A Review of 5 Years of Planning for Climate Change

Northern communities face unprecedented environmental change as a result of climate variability, which will affect decisions about travel, wildlife harvesting, engineering and construction, and risk mitigation. The Community Climate Change Adaptation Program focused on four communities in Yukon and northern British Columbia – Whitehorse, Dawson City, Mayo, and Atlin – and assessed the extent to which they are potentially vulnerable to a changing climate. Results were used to develop local adaptation plans. This poster reviews the challenges of adaptation planing, incorporation of climate scenarios, implications for communities and potential future directions for mainstreaming adaptation plans into policy-making and planning decisions.

Duerden, F., Hennessey, R., and Kinnear, L. (2012) Yukon Community Adaptation Program: A Review of 5 Years of Planning for Climate Change. International Polar Year 2012: From Knowledge to Action, Montreal, 22-27 April, 2012. Poster presentation.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' SCET Fall 2012 Course Guide'; ?>

SCET Fall 2012 Course Guide

default publication image

 SCET Fall 2012 Course Guide

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Yukon Research Centre Brochure'; ?>

Yukon Research Centre Brochure

Yukon Research Centre Brochure

Learn about the Yukon Research Centre and the services offered to visiting researchers, innovators and students.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - A Kluane First Nation/YRC Partnership Project'; ?>

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - A Kluane First Nation/YRC Partnership Project

Community Energy and Emissions Inventory - A Kluane First Nation/YRC Partnership Project

A community-based approach to inventorying energy and greenhouse gas emissions was developed and carried out by Kluane First Nation (KFN) and the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) in 2011/2012. Residents and commercial and government operators in Burwash Landing, Destruction Bay, and Silver City were interviewed about the types of energy they depend on—including how much it costs them, and how much they used in 2011—and the associated greenhouse gas emissions were derived. Consideration was given to stationary energy (electricity and heat generation), transport energy (on and off-road vehicle use), and waste sectors. Views on energy concerns and success stories were also solicited to provide insight into the inventory as well as future directions that could be taken with local energy production and consumption. In addition, building characteristics, such as mode of heating, quality of insulation, etc., were gathered so the communities may effectively monitor and interpret changes to energy consumption and emissions over time. This approach to understanding energy use and emissions at the community scale is unique in that it draws upon the strengths of both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies to illuminate current and potential energy states.

Christensen, L. 2012. Community Energy and Emissions Inventory: A Kluane First Nation-Yukon Research Centre Partnership Project. Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 78 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan'; ?>

Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan is based on a collaborative process that draws on the experience and knowledge of residents and integrates it with scientific expertise. The plan is primarily intended as a resource for community use and to support other planning and decision-making processes in the study area.

Hennessey, R., Stuart, S. and Duerden, F., 2012. Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 103 p.

 

Hennessey, R., Stuart, S. and Duerden, F., 2012. Mayo Region Climate Change Adaptation Plan. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 103 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Education Plan'; ?>

Education Plan

default publication image

 Education Plan

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Strategic Plan'; ?>

Strategic Plan

default publication image

 Strategic Plan

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Annual Report'; ?>

Annual Report

default publication image

 Annual Report

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Projected Future Changes in Glaciers and their Contribution to Discharge of the Yukon River'; ?>

Projected Future Changes in Glaciers and their Contribution to Discharge of the Yukon River

Projected Future Changes in Glaciers and their Contribution to Discharge of the Yukon River

 Last year, Yukon Energy Corporation (YEC) hired scientists from the Yukon Research Centre's Northern Climate Exchange, the University of Alberta and the Yukon Geological Survey to gather information on the expected impacts of climate change on the glaciers that feed YEC's hydro systems.

Here are some of the key findings:

1. Glaciers currently contribute 16 percent and 7 percent of the total annual flow volume of the Upper Yukon River through melt and wastage, respectively. Melt refers to snow and ice that is less than or equivalent to the volume of snow accumulated into a glacier system each year. Wastage is melt that exceeds the volume of snow accumulation into a glacier system in a given year, resulting in a net loss from the glacier.

2. Of these amounts, 46 percent and 39 percent is solely derived from the Llewellyn Glacier near Atlin. This highlights its importance in terms of runoff contribution relative to other glaciers in the region.

3. Snowmelt from non-glacier sources accounts for about 44 percent of the total annual flow of the Upper Yukon River. Rainfall and groundwater make up the remaining 33 percent.

4. Glacier wastage will continue to enhance runoff into the Yukon River for many decades into the future.

5. There will likely be increased annual runoff in the Yukon River, with higher flows in the ‘shoulder’ seasons (i.e. early spring and late fall).

The information from this study is valuable to YEC. An immediate outcome is that it has helped YEC's staff to more accurately predict the volume of water flowing through the Yukon River system this year.

The report suggests more study should be done of the Llewellyn Glacier due to its vast size and its potentially high sensitivity to climate change. YEC will continue to work with the Northern Climate Exchange to gather more information on this subject.

 Northern Climate ExChange, 2012. Projected Future Changes in Glaciers and their Contribution to Discharge of the Yukon River at Whitehorse. Northern Climate ExChange, Yukon Research Centre, Yukon College, Whitehorse, YT, 44 p.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Your Yukon - Archive 2012'; ?>

Your Yukon - Archive 2012

default publication image

This column is coordinated by the Yukon Research Centre (YRC) at Yukon College, with major financial support from Environment Yukon and YRC. These articles are published biweekly in the Friday edition of the Yukon News.

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Yukon Revegetation Manual'; ?>

Yukon Revegetation Manual

Yukon Revegetation Manual

The new Yukon Revegetation Manual (PDF 48 MB) describes methods for planning and implementing revegetation projects in Yukon. It takes a practical approach based on experience with various methodologies and plant species that have proven to be successful in the territory over the past three decades. The Manual was designed to address a range of revegetation sites and applications, from borrow pits and mine sites, to highway right-of-ways, transmission lines and pipeline corridors.

 

The Yukon Revegetation Manual was written as an update of Guidelines for Reclamation/Revegetation in the Yukon published in 1993 (Vol. 1) and 1996 (Vol. 2).

 

Since the 1993 guidelines were written, a number of plant species it recommended have turned out to be commercially unavailable, while others were ineffective in Yukon conditions and a few have turned out to be invasive. The current Manual uses a more site-specific approach because experience has shown that the geographic location of a revegetation project in Yukon is less critical than other aspects of the site, such as slope, elevation, soil fertility, soil moisture, soil organic content and level of disturbance and it takes a “how-to” approach by explaining methods and equipment in detail.


 

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Viewbook 2015-17'; ?>

Viewbook 2015-17

Viewbook 2015-17

Viewbook 2015-17

Yukon College Home YRC '.$pub_title.' Continuing Education & Training'; ?>

Continuing Education & Training

Continuing Education & Training

Continuing Education and Training catalogue.